Small, Fast, Antifragile, Edgy, Visionary, Human: A Digital December

The other day I summarized my year as raising 10 digits for digital. That theme arose because I was reviewing my twitter posts for December, and everything seemed digital-focused.

Clearly, alinea

Here are a few “digital” things that I learned in December:

Added to my to-read list, Whiplash by Joi Ito. Why? Simple. This is a manifesto of the digital age.

Which always brings me back to my antifragility epiphanyResilience always wins out over Strength.

A digital mindset offers optionality. It is visionary:

Perversely, however, it is the focus on small items and ideas that creates (incremental) breakthrough. We live in an age of small ideas.

This is when we get to consider the edge, the new thinking. Interestingly, the internet itself is beginning to reform at its edges, just as its central backbone stiffens.

This duality is important. The embrace of small, edge operations opens up the door to move as fast as hell.

The outcome of which is we can secure quick wins – scale up – sustain change. #DigitalTransformation

And our job as digital marketers in all this is to create shareable micro experiences, not “webpage” content. We experiment.

This allows us to make a lot of video content…

Moreover, digital offers us the chance to partner with our audiences, to move beyond storytelling to storymaking, co-created.

In our team, the number one reason for us to produce so much content is that we work to unlock the latent power of our 8000 colleagues as storymakers.

My guess is that more and more hires will occur through this kind of cooperation. We already have an adjunct team member because of her proactive, prosumer delivery of content. GE is increasingly hiring for promise not skills. We are too.

Which always reminds me of the hiring advice of Dee Hock.

And talent is always the bottleneck, not technology…

So let’s tie this up around people…One of the core issues of talking about technology is that the cool, digital impacts tends to overshadow the humble human experiences that happen alongside. We must struggle every day to keep people in the centre of the process. Let the tech come along for the ride.

Dion Hinchcliffe reminds us that the number one digital skill is inherently human – working out loud.

Of course, if we don’t remain human-centred, then the vultures are waiting to feast on (y)our bones.

Stay lucky!

←This Much We Know.→

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s